RESTORATION GENETICS

 

Theme leader: Paul Nevill 

Research Supervision: Prof Siegfried Krauss, Prof Kingsley Dixon, and Prof Grant Wardell-Johnson

Objectives: Train researchers in the application of molecular, genecological, remote sensing and mapping approaches for understanding the drivers and consequences of adaptively significant genetic variation and its spatial structure, to inform decisions regarding seed sourcing and seed farming for better restoration outcomes.

Outcomes: (1)Identify genetically optimal ecotypes and local habitat-matched provenance boundaries for restoration sites; (2) Ensure genetically appropriate germplasm is established in ex-situ seed banks and seed farms; (3) Describe the mating systems of priority taxa to maximise seed production in wild and farmed seed source populations.

 


 

Assessing the use of metabarcoding to monitor mine site restoration

by Mieke van der Heyde

Mining is a multibillion dollar industry in Western Australia and mine site restoration has increasingly become a concern for mining companies and the public. Monitoring is a crucial aspect of determining restoration success and indicating when further remediation may be necessary. Metabarcoding is a tool that may allow biological auditing from DNA in the environment, and can provide cost-effective monitoring that can detect flora, fauna and microbial communities. PhD student Mieke van der Heyde is undertaking research to determine how to optimize and apply metabarcoding monitoring for mine site restoration. 

Adaptive and phylogeographic variation in sympatric parasitic and non-parasitic species in Western Australia

by Sheree Walters

Mining is a multibillion dollar industry in Western Australia and mine site restoration has increasingly become a concern for mining companies and the public. Monitoring is a crucial aspect of determining restoration success and indicating when further remediation may be necessary. Metabarcoding is a tool that may allow biological auditing from DNA in the environment, and can provide cost-effective monitoring that can detect flora, fauna and microbial communities. PhD student Mieke van der Heyde is undertaking research to determine how to optimize and apply metabarcoding monitoring for mine site restoration.